Where is my seat

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I recently went to a Colorado Rockies baseball game with my son and was amused at the antics of some of the fans. There were two ladies who began the game sitting one row down from us. Soon I saw them hopping over seats and plopping down a few rows further down and to our left. Then I shook my head when 20 minutes later they were approached by people saying those were their seats and watched with amazement as these two ladies moved up a few rows and over across the aisle. From there I lost track of them. It was obvious that they did not like their original seats and were looking to get something better. “Where is my seat” seemed to be a game they were playing in the stadium as the Rockies were playing their ballgame on the field.

As I reflected on these two rather restless ladies, I began to compare their predicament with mine of walking through grief. There have certainly been times when I was unhappy with where I found myself and I was eager to do anything to move to another place. In fact, that is probably true more often than not. Really, what person desires to walk through the pain of losing a loved one?

However, in order to heal, that is exactly what you must do. You must embrace the journey and dive in headfirst to what lies ahead. When you take that giant leap of faith, you may find yourself floundering for a while asking “Where is my seat.” The thing with the grief journey is your seat will continue to change. The position in which you are seated today will not be where you need to be sitting three months from now. In a year, you will find yourself in a completely different position and ready for another seat in order to view your ever-changing world correctly.

The desire is that you will be like those two ladies at the ballgame. You do not want to stay in the same seat forever. That first seat of grief has a poor view of your future. It is impossible to make out what life looks like and how you are supposed to respond to the world around you. However, as you take those first steps to trudge through your sorrow, you will find yourself in a new and better position; one that allows you to see a bit clearer.

Eventually you will get to the point where you will not have to ask “where is my seat” any longer because you have finally arrived at the place where joy is abundant and you once again feel at home with your circumstance. I have recently read and committed to memory a verse from the Bible. “You reveal the path of life to me; in Your presence is abundant joy; in Your right hand are eternal pleasures.” Psalm 16:11 (NIV)

Eventually you will no longer find yourself asking “Where is my seat” because you have finally found a way to feel at home and at peace right where you are; in the midst of healing and in the embrace of a God Who loves you immensely.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Please Remember

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I recently attended the funeral of a lovely, kind-hearted, young man. While I did not know him personally, I listened and learned as his family recalled stories of their life with this brother, son, uncle, and friend. He was much-loved even though he may not have realized it. Happiness seemed to escape him. And this made me sad. So I want to say please remember some very important truths.

Please remember that even though you still have sad days, they do not define you as a sad person. When you walk through grief, it is easy to be seen as untouchable and unapproachable. This is not because others lack caring for your circumstances, but because people just do not know what to say or how to help. As you move forward in your grief journey, that sadness will lessen allowing joy and happiness to move in and be experienced more and more.

Realize that you matter as a person. Please remember that even though life has changed, there still is a life for you to live. Because you have the gift of life, there is a responsibility to live that life well. Not perfectly – no one can achieve that. Your path will be filled with plenty of missteps and wrong turns. However, use those errors as motivation and do better next time. Embrace those circumstances and learn from them. Resist from giving up on yourself and the life you are living.

Please remember from where your strength truly originates. When I feel sad, weak, or overwhelmed, I recall a promising verse from scripture. “That is why, for Christ’s sake, I delight in weaknesses, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions, in difficulties. For when I am weak, then I am strong.”                       2 Corinthians 12:10 (NIV) My strength is found in my relationship with Jesus Christ. When it seems impossible to move forward, surrender to and lean on Jesus. He will give you what you need for another day.

This recent funeral service touched me so deeply that I want to make sure that my friends and family know certain things about me too. Please remember that I know who I am. My identity is not just that of a widow, a mother, sister, aunt, or a friend. I am loved and treasured because I am a child of God. Even though I have rough days, I am never without hope. Assurance surrounds my life, not because I am a good or powerful person – but because I know and serve a good and powerful God. Please remember that I do not seek your pity. Instead, I desire for you to be inspired by how I live. And in those times that I fail to live well and make right choices, I ask you to forgive me. Please remember that I am an imperfect person who truly desires to point you to a perfect Creator who wants a relationship with you – His creation.

Until next time –

Karen

Won’t you consider buying Grief Letters for a loved one or for yourself? Begin the year with hope and purpose. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

 

The days after

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So much effort is put into anticipating and preparing for special holidays, that you are often surprised by the days after it is all over. Thanksgiving and Christmas have already come and gone. Those special days you have come to dread without your loved one are finally finished. You have survived. Perhaps you enjoyed those harder days a bit more than you thought you would. The opportunity to laugh and smile came into play and you grasped those, filling your mind with new and different memories. Or perhaps you merely scraped by each day, putting forth the effort only for the sake of friends and loved ones still with you.

Many people feel sadness when the holidays are over. The much awaited excitement ends and a let-down from the process can occur. However, there is also a kind of relief that takes places for those on the grief journey. Now that the holidays are over, it is possible to let down your guard a little more. You do not find it necessary to brace for those waves of sadness and nostalgia that hit at the most inopportune times when others around you are laughing and enjoying the celebrations.

Along with the relief can come a bit of satisfaction that you really did make it through the holidays. Not only that, but hopefully you can find one or two truly golden moments to remember with fondness. Look back at the past month that has been full of activities, parties and gatherings, and demands. Celebrate and applaud yourself for accomplishing what you doubted you could live through. You survived the holidays!

As each year passes, the holidays will get better too. You will face them with less dread, you will find more joy, and you will create new traditions. Take a moment to breathe and realize that your future can look bright. Set your sights on what you want to accomplish now that the world around you is returning to “post-holiday normal” and decide what you will do next.

The grieving are not the only people facing a sort of depression and sadness the days after the holidays are over. Many people encounter quite a let-down after all their planning and celebrating. However, you and I have already learned to adjust to newness and changing times. You have an advantage on the rest of the world. You know you can face loss and life that is different from before. Take that knowledge and run with it. Plan new adventures for the upcoming new year. Revel in the fact that God has seen you through this past difficult month.

As you face the future of the days after, know that it can be a blank slate upon which you write your own possibilities, hopes, and dreams. Move forward with as much joy as you can muster and be open to blessings that are in store for you.

Until next time –

Karen

With a new year upon us, consider buying Grief Letters for a loved one or for yourself. Begin the year with hope and purpose. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Little Piggy

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Recently I had the opportunity to travel to Seattle for work. As I walked into the hotel lobby, one of the first things that caught my eye was this large, white pig covered with very colorful bling. As I was meeting new friends in that lobby after checking in, a little boy walked right up to the pig and punched it as hard as he could. Poor little guy. I imagine he thought it was stuffed and expected it to be soft and squishy. However, he ended up grabbing his hand in tears with his mommy running over to tend to him. He was sure fooled by the little piggy.

I thought it might be interesting to compare that little piggy to the grief journey you travel when you face the death of a loved one. What do grief and this piggy have in common and how do they differ?

There is irony regarding this dressed up little piggy. There are some great things about pigs. They certainly can be cute and sweet. A neighbor down the street has a little pig as a pet. We’ve nicknamed him Bacon, although I’m not sure his owners would appreciate the joke. He is fun to watch as he plays, enjoying the sun, and rolling around in the dirt of their backyard. Pigs do serve a purpose. They provide good and nourishing food. Their heart valves have even been used in place of failing human ones.* But let’s face it. Pigs can be dirty and smelly. They have a reputation for eating slop and things people would consider uneatable. Not everyone appreciates the pig.

There are times when you walk through grief that you try to dress it up and make life look pretty. You feel pressure to disguise the true ugliness you face each day. The difficulty of tears, lack of sleep, and loss of appetite certainly present challenges to living well each day. In order to make others feel more comfortable in your presence, you put on a brave face and insist that things are good and you are fine. However, this “artificial bling” you put forth cannot fool the wise. No matter how hard you try to make your life pretty again, the ugliness of grief will continue to present itself when you least expect it.

No matter how hard you try to make it different and better, there are days when your loss is ugly and dirty. It requires hard work to deal with grief. You must get your hands dirty and dig down deep at times to face your fears in order to move forward toward healing and happiness. Nothing about grief is fun. It stinks – plain and simple.

However, just as those who accept the little piggy into their home soon loves and embraces it as a pet, when you accept the grief you face, it can propel you forward in your journey. There is a difference between the two things that cannot be reconciled. Living with loss will never be fun like having a pet. But embracing the truth of loss and being willing to admit that life will be different is the first step to healing and finding joy in life again.

Each day as you wake up and remember the harsh reality of life, do your best to remember the lesson of this little piggy. While you can life dress up and pretend that your grief journey is going well, remember that it is okay to have some harder days. Embrace them and look for the bits of joy and healing you will find when you keep working to move forward through loss.

Until next time –

Karen

* http://animalsmart.org/species/pigs

Choose to give hope to someone in your life today. Share Grief Letters with those you know walking through loss and sadness. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief.

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

 

Listen to your guide

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I have been out this past week, running a preteen camp for my church. One of our days was filled with white-water rafting on the Colorado River. Mad Adventures is the tour company I use for this exciting activity. They have a very knowledgeable staff that works hard to keep us safe. While on the water, we are reminded time and again to listen to your guide. Their wise words and actions enable us to arrive at our destination down river safely.

As you journey through grief and loss, you can find help and encouragement in listening to your guide as well. However, who do you know that can provide wisdom in the difficult days ahead? Has someone else’s journey through death and loss proved they know their stuff and are able to show you the way as well? What is their track record? Do they seem reliable?

These are all questions you might ask while watching others walk through loss. As you wonder how you will take your next step forward, you long for strength and guidance, looking around for a source to plug into. While God can surely place people in your path to help and cheer you on, you do need to carefully choose your guide.

Placing too much faith and trust in people will eventually bring disappointment. While others mean well, no one person can possibly meet all your needs. It is important to remember that while you both may have suffered a loss, no two losses are exactly the same. Situations and circumstances differ from person to person – loss to loss. That being the case, what can you do as you seek further help and healing on your own journey?

You can remember the hope and promise found in God’s Word. Even as you struggle to find your footing to stand upright and slowly make your way toward healing, take the time to embrace scripture. One particular passage has held great meaning for me.

“For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Romans 8:38, 39

Even when you feel that no one can understand and no one cares, you can be assured that God does. You may fear that you are alone on your journey, but His presence in your life is guaranteed when you know Him personally. Nothing can separate you from God. Not even death.

So during those times when you feel abandoned by your loved one, look up and remember this promise. When you feel you cannot possibly continue on, stop and listen to your guide, Jesus Christ. Healing rarely comes instantly – but it does come. Your joy will slowly return as you wake each morning and learn to discern the voice of your guide from all the other noises filling your world.

Until next time –

Karen

Let me encourage you to share Grief Letters with those you know walking through loss and sadness. This devotion book is filled with stories of my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief.

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Stocking the pantry

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One of my recent household chores was to clean out my pantry. Upon the marriage of my son, I determined there were items on the shelves I no longer needed to keep. Sweets, mixes, and crackers were no longer necessary to keep since my son lives elsewhere now. Nineteen months ago I was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance condition. Because of this, there are certain foods that my digestive system will no longer handle so there is no point in keeping them in my pantry. Stocking the pantry with my healthy-for-me foods brought satisfaction as I surveyed my progress.

The grief journey brings about another form of stocking the pantry when it comes to equipping yourself to handle the loss of a loved one. Some things that you participated in are no longer possible or desirable without your special loved one. When conditions change, you find yourself having to make adjustments in stocking the pantry so you can learn to make progress and move forward with life.

Discovering what you now need to successfully maneuver grief is all part of learning, adjusting, and stocking the pantry of your current life. Placing helpful items on your shelves will enable you to continue forward movement and experience healing through a very difficult part of life.

One necessary item you want to possess is faith. When this element is placed in your pantry, you can find strength and hope for the days ahead. Knowing that your life will not always seem so discouraging and lonely is vital to being able to hold your head up and place your foot forward. Faith in God is trusting that He has not forgotten nor forsaken you, even when you fail to feel His presence nearby.

Persistence or tenacity is another helpful item to place upon your shelf when you are stocking the pantry. You will experience days that for some reason are suddenly incredibly difficult. Without the ability to dig in and hold fast you can find yourself sliding backwards into hopelessness. Keep telling yourself that you can do this! Not because you are strong yourself, but because you have a God who is mightier than anything you will encounter along your grief journey. So while you may have a momentary set-back, do not forget to hang in there with persistence – being stubborn enough to never give up.

While stocking the pantry, you will not want to miss placing front and foremost the ability to keep your joy. This is an emotion that is rightfully yours if you know Jesus Christ personally. It is a fruit of the spirit listed in Galatians 5. While you may not feel happy these days, and understandable so, you must remember that no one, no thing, no event should be able to steal your joy. Go ahead and cry your tears. It is natural and expected to feel sadness and even momentary fear. However, throughout your roller coaster of emotions, do not forsake the right you have to see and taste joy daily.

Joy is different from happiness, which is dependent upon your circumstances. Joy is dependent upon nothing more than knowing Who the source of your joy is – Christ. Having joy does not mean that you must be cheerful and pretend with a false exuberance for life. You are going to have sad days. Some days will be just downright bad and disappointing. Use your pantry ingredients of faith and persistence to hold onto your joy. With it, you will always know that there is hope for tomorrow.

As you work at stocking the pantry, placing faith, persistence, and joy in prominent places, you will find there is also room for other items such as hope, laughter, friendship, and rest. I wish you the best as you learn to reorganize and evaluate those things you need to throw away and embrace those pantry ingredients that are best to keep and enjoy.

“But the fruit of the spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faith, gentleness, self-control.” Galatians 5:22 (HCSB)

Until next time –

Karen

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Brakes and gas

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When I was learning to drive I was warned about the bad habit of pushing the accelerator, quickly slamming on the brakes, then laying on the gas again. The extreme use of applying brakes and gas certainly is not a smooth or smart way to drive. In fact, the overuse of them can actually create a dangerous situation.

As you travel along grief’s road, there will be occasion for you to halt your forward progress in order to slow down and process your emotions and deal with life’s demands. It will be natural for you to be still at times, receiving needed rest and time before once again moving forward. While you can expect your progress of healing to slow and even stop for a short while, most of your grief journey will be spent moving forward.

You may have days when you feel lost and finding joy seems hopeless. Anticipating the pain of recurring grief, you may unintentionally be applying the brakes in your journey, fearing the hurt that may be ahead. By digging in your heels and refusing to move forward, you actually can cause more heartache for yourself and those around you. Being unwilling to accept the changes that grief brings is a sad place to park.

There is also danger in stepping too quickly on the gas while moving along grief’s road. Wanting to avoid the pain and sadness associated with death, some people choose to ignore their loss and hurry through each day. They refusing to admit a need to process what has happened and work through certain emotions. Speeding ahead full steam without awareness of your surroundings may cause you to repeat your journey later down the road instead of healing and finding comfort and joy in the present.

The misuse of both brakes and gas in your grief can cause your journey to be jerky at best. Though traveling through grief is never smooth, it is possible to move ahead at a reasonable, doable, and healthy speed. Expecting the turns and obstacles that slow you down will help you process more quickly. Fearing those same turns and obstacles is not necessary when you trust that God has a plan for your future and none of your present life situation has caught Him by surprise.

Everyone will move along the journey of grief at their own pace. There is no one correct speed that should be dictated to all who are on this journey. No formula can promise that in a certain amount of months of years, you will feel all better. Just as you are an individual and uniquely created by God, your journey is unique as well.

Move forward with confidence. Do your best to find joy along the way. Admit when you need to slow down and rejoice when you can gain a little momentum. The reasonable use of brakes and gas is necessary in your journey. May you be encouraged to find the right combination for you.

Until next time –

Karen

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Favorite things

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There is a comfort in taking time to remember what really brings you joy. What are the favorite things in your world that add pleasure to your life? Before you say, “But without my loved one…..” let us establish that yes, life is now different. And no, not everything can be the same. However, there are still some great things you can appreciate as you live out each day.

Making a list of your favorite things will not only be therapeutic, but can bring gratitude back into a life that has been battered and broken by grief. Recalling those things that you enjoy can remind you that there is still good in this world. Perhaps you are a creative or artistic person who takes pleasure in making things. Then give yourself the gift of filling a Favorite Things Box or making a collage of items that can still bring a smile to your face.

Is it the sound and smell of a gentle rain accompanied by jarring thunder? Maybe music touches your heart in a special way. Burning a CD of certain songs may release your sadness leaving room for joy to bloom. Perhaps you find relaxation in beginning the day slowing, savoring the sunshine streaming into your bedroom while catching up on some reading.

Reflect upon old hobbies you used to enjoy. Is it time to take part in those again? Sports, crocheting, cooking, playing an instrument, gardening, jogging, writing, singing,…. Do any of these resonate with you? Is it time to learn a new skill? There is a beauty and satisfaction in discovering new abilities. Just because you have never done something before does not mean it is impossible or too late to learn it now.

Shortly after Alan’s death, I realized that I was missing out on so much by sitting at home and doing nothing more than working and sleeping. Auditioning for a local choir met a need that I had. Singing with Voices West has been fulfilling and healing.

What is it that is causing you to hesitate? Do not let your fears and doubts stop you from trying something new. That thing you have always wanted to do may just be the thing that propels you forward on your journey.

When you lost your loved one you did not lose the ability to continue living and growing. Your days should have purpose. There is a reason that you are still here. Now – today –  is the time to discover things about yourself you may not have known. Be courageous and willing to branch out and reach upward. Dig deep within and be amazed at what you uncover. Marvel in the favorite things you still find in life. Embrace and enjoy them. Your loved one would want you to smile and be happy.

Until next time –

Karen

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

 

Something Beautiful

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There have been plenty of times when the last thing I felt was something beautiful. The early days of grief took their toll. I failed to eat well, lost drastic weight and looked drawn. Lack of sleep caused dark circles under my eyes and zapped the energy from my normally upbeat disposition. Inability to concentrate and the absence of the desire to socialize inadvertently landed me in a place of isolation that was unhealthy, lonely, and at times frightening. The journey was hard, the days were dark, and beauty was difficult to find.

How could any good thing exist in the midst of such loss? As you travel your own grief journey it can be hard to see clearly. Life can seem so broken that all you see is ugliness and pain. However, stay the course and hold fast to your faith believing that death is not the end. It can be the beginning of something good. Something beautiful will begin to seep into your view if you keep searching.

Picture the tiny, homely caterpillar. It spends its days inching along, living life as only a caterpillar can live. While its existence may seem mundane and ordinary, there is a journey of beauty just ahead! After the hard work of cocooning and waiting, transformation is realized, a butterfly appears, and something beautiful is achieved. Because the tiny caterpillar was willing to keep doing life, it found fulfillment and discovered its purpose as it flies into the sky.

Hard work that went into building that life-changing caterpillar cocoon. The same goes for your grief journey. Walking it well takes work and persistence, even in the midst of adversity, pain, and sorrow. Trust that there is something beautiful in your future and keep walking forward. Believe there is a good purpose for all you are currently enduring and experiencing.

On the days that you have difficulty seeing something beautiful, know that even when you do not know it, others are catching a glimpse of beauty through your determination to journey well and your can-do attitude. Stand strong and have courage!

“Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” Joshua 1:9 (NIV)

Until next time –

Karen

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

 

Calm waters

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I remember our family vacations spent at a resort at the Lake of the Ozarks when I was a kid. The weather was warm, the scenery quiet, and the lake held calm waters where we enjoyed fishing, swimming, and water skiing. Each year we anticipated the rejuvenating restfulness that occurred with a week away together. The time spent at Bull Shoals was healing and helpful in dealing with our lives throughout the rest of the year.

What helps you deal with life and your journey? Is there a place to which you retreat that brings healing and hope? Perhaps you too have a favorite family vacation spot. Maybe you find your relaxing haven in a special coffee shop or as close as a quiet corner of your home.

Wherever you make your special place of rest and ‘calm waters,’ adding the balm of scripture will enhance your healing. There is much comfort to be found in the pages of God’s Word. While you do your best to provide your own respite, do not overlook adding the messages available to you in the Bible.

The first and last verses of Psalm 42 paint a beautiful word picture.

“As the deer pants for streams of water, so my soul pants for you, my God.”

Psalm 42:1 (NIV)

“Why, my soul, are you downcast? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God.” Psalm 42:11 (NIV)

That thirsty deer knows where to go for relief and filling. Just as the cool, calm waters provide refreshment and restores strength for this lovely animal, you too can find restoration for your heart and soul as you turn to God.

Grief does things to the human mind. It can harden you, causing you to push away from the very One who can help. Casting blame upon God happens when things fail to make sense on the journey of grief. When you find yourself reacting in this manner, choose the calm waters of His peace instead. Trust the faithfulness you have heard of and witnessed in the past. Make the decision to praise Him in spite of your circumstances.

Questioning your journey is not unusual. But then, who wants to settle for the ordinary? Go one step beyond, search for, and find the calm waters that God wants to provide for your grief journey. May you find healing, peace, and hope as you choose to embrace the positives of life that are all around.

Until next time –

Karen

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.