The Unexpected

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A miscommunication in texting with a friend last night turned out to provide a much-needed laugh. Her text came through to me asking where Batman lives. I responded with “Gotham City?” and was confused when she wrote back, “Whatttt???” Then she realized that the word she had written was auto-corrected and changed to Batman. I had a good laugh as I then understood the weird and the unexpected conversation.

There are times in life when we are faced with the unexpected. It might be an unexpected conversation, the sudden appearance of someone, a surprising reaction from others, or an unpredicted outcome at work. The longer you live, the more you come to understand that there are surprises and you are often left to deal with the unexpected in life.

Grief is oftentimes unexpected. Even if your loved one had an illness which led your family through months of difficulty and their final passing may have been eminent, the actual diagnosis was probably unexpected as well as unwanted. While you realize that sickness, sadness, and death are part of life, when those events invade your daily routine, they catch you off-guard.

So how do you handle the unexpected things in grief? Is it possible to regain your footing against the intrusion made in your life and upon the plans you had for your future? Yes, you will survive the grief and the unexpected turn that you are now facing. Will it be easy to do so? Of course not. No one who has experienced grief and loss will tell you the journey is easy.

So how do you face the unexpected things of grief? I believe that God uses the first few months to numb you from the pain. I know that there are actually many details in those first few days of grief that I do not have clear memories of. A sense of auto-pilot takes over and the necessary arrangements are made with the help of family and friends. So while your journey has taken an unexpected detour, you somehow are able to function and survive by the grace of God.

As time moves forward and your world changes and little daily adjustments are made, the numbness begins to wear off and you suddenly feel the unexpected weight of your pain. These are hard days to face. You awake to some mornings where you want to choose to stay in bed rather than get up and face your day. Doing this once in a while can actually be a healthy and necessary “mental health day.” Recognizing what you need to refuel and function well in your grief is important. As long as you don’t spend each and every day staying in bed and avoiding life all together, an occasional day off is recommended.

Grief also has a way of throwing road blocks in your path. Oftentimes, an unexpected thing will be a trigger that threatens to throw you back into the depths of your sorrow. The ability to be flexible and give grace where needed is likely to help you through these little surprises of life. While you may want guarantees, there are few of those in life. Learn what things you can give up and what items are non-negotiable to you and your journey will be likely be smoother as you move forward in your grief.

Surprises can endanger your sense of well-being too. Feeling paralyzed by fear and doubt can be very real as the unexpected appears now and then. Work hard at not giving power to these surprises. They are just slight hiccups in the bigger picture of your life. Keep your eyes focused on your goals and desires and upon where you are headed, not where you have been.

In all of this, remember that God desires to strengthen you and hold you up when you feel you can go no further. I read the following verse a few months ago and have come to appreciate its promise that God goes before me to ease my trek.

“Every valley shall be raised up, every mountain and hill made low;

the rough ground shall become level, the rugged places a plain.” Isaiah 40:4 (NIV)

Until next time –

Karen

When the unexpected happens, Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Where is my seat

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I recently went to a Colorado Rockies baseball game with my son and was amused at the antics of some of the fans. There were two ladies who began the game sitting one row down from us. Soon I saw them hopping over seats and plopping down a few rows further down and to our left. Then I shook my head when 20 minutes later they were approached by people saying those were their seats and watched with amazement as these two ladies moved up a few rows and over across the aisle. From there I lost track of them. It was obvious that they did not like their original seats and were looking to get something better. “Where is my seat” seemed to be a game they were playing in the stadium as the Rockies were playing their ballgame on the field.

As I reflected on these two rather restless ladies, I began to compare their predicament with mine of walking through grief. There have certainly been times when I was unhappy with where I found myself and I was eager to do anything to move to another place. In fact, that is probably true more often than not. Really, what person desires to walk through the pain of losing a loved one?

However, in order to heal, that is exactly what you must do. You must embrace the journey and dive in headfirst to what lies ahead. When you take that giant leap of faith, you may find yourself floundering for a while asking “Where is my seat.” The thing with the grief journey is your seat will continue to change. The position in which you are seated today will not be where you need to be sitting three months from now. In a year, you will find yourself in a completely different position and ready for another seat in order to view your ever-changing world correctly.

The desire is that you will be like those two ladies at the ballgame. You do not want to stay in the same seat forever. That first seat of grief has a poor view of your future. It is impossible to make out what life looks like and how you are supposed to respond to the world around you. However, as you take those first steps to trudge through your sorrow, you will find yourself in a new and better position; one that allows you to see a bit clearer.

Eventually you will get to the point where you will not have to ask “where is my seat” any longer because you have finally arrived at the place where joy is abundant and you once again feel at home with your circumstance. I have recently read and committed to memory a verse from the Bible. “You reveal the path of life to me; in Your presence is abundant joy; in Your right hand are eternal pleasures.” Psalm 16:11 (NIV)

Eventually you will no longer find yourself asking “Where is my seat” because you have finally found a way to feel at home and at peace right where you are; in the midst of healing and in the embrace of a God Who loves you immensely.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Familiar

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I do quite a bit of typing at work between planning lessons and camps, writing material for classes, and communicating with people. In order to keep my wrists happy, I also use a special ergonomic keyboard. However, I have used it so much, that the markings on many of the keys are worn off. This has not bothered me at all since I am quite proficient at typing. Yet when others sit down to use my computer, I hear comments such as, “How can you know where the keys are?” I suppose it is because the keyboard letter positions are familiar to me. I know where they are without even looking. I can count on my fingers just landing on the right keys out of habit and years of practice.

As you continue on your grief journey, the familiar things of life often feel lost to you. No longer are you certain what the day may hold. Things that you have counted on fail to be part of your life now. People you have known for years are no longer with you. How can you endure the loss of familiarity as you make your way through life?

As I type, I feel my way along the keyboard. I know where certain letters are in relation to others. Typing has become second nature to me. What about in life though? Now that elements of your life have drastically been altered, can you still know where you stand and in which direction you should move? I believe you can.

As people, we tend to rely upon feelings to guide us in life. While this is a common practice, I am not so sure that it is always wise. Feeling for and expecting the familiar can leave you uncertain when all you are able to conjure up are unfamiliar emotions. While you long for what you know, you find yourself unacquainted with the demands of adjusting and modifying what you thought would be your life.

The familiar seems lost to you and suddenly you are forced to find a new path to walk; a new way to live. I find comfort in knowing that no matter how unexpected your life journey is now, there is one thing you can count on to never change.

God is a constant in this world. When nothing else seems to make sense, you can be certain of God’s sovereignty and ability to meet your needs, even in the midst of loss and grief. When all the familiar things you have been certain of seem to be gone from your grasp, the things of God are still very much in place and within reach.

It is with His help and guidance that you will eventually be able to look back at those missing, familiar things of life and realize that new feelings, new people, and new adventures have filled your days. All of the sudden, it seems that the unfamiliar is actually there to help you move forward. Life has great promise again. Hope and joy enter your daily picture as you become familiar with new things, new people, and new choices.

Do not give up just because what you know – the familiar – is gone. Instead, choose to look ahead and be open to change. Who knows, right around the corner may be an exciting element to add to your new life. Here’s to become familiar with fresh possibilities.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

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Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

I am thankful for –

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There are times when I need to be encouraged by feeling hope and joy. Even though much has changed and life is very, very different, there are still plenty of things I am thankful for. Day-to-day life can be exhausting and overwhelming. In the midst of feeling as if all you can do is survive certain days, it is helpful to stop and do an inventory of the all the things you can enjoy.

Some days you may wonder what God is up to. Reviewing what you are thankful for can start you down the road to feeling better. Grief is a journey with ups and downs. Hang on tightly and prepare yourself for the marathon of grief. At those times when you find yourself running low on fuel, fill up by composing your own list of some of the things you are thankful for. Here is a list of items that easily and quickly came to my mind as I began thinking on this topic. I am thankful for and enjoy:

The smell of freshly mowed grass

Bright yellow tulips

Good friends

The hope that love provides

Thunderstorms

Beautiful music

The laughter of children

Spending time with family

A good hug

Teaching and helping others see their potential

An interesting book

A good cry

The chance to sing with good musicians

The kindness of strangers

Second chances

Studying and discovering treasures in the Bible

Writing

A sincere compliment

Finding a great pair of jeans

Remembering the past

Looking forward to the future

Giving today my all

Helping others

Fresh flowers on my desk

Massages

Reading this list gives me hope and makes me smile. It helps me realize that I can still feel good about life. Perhaps you are still wondering if you will ever move past the numbness of loss and the pain of grief. Begin your own list. There is no shame in starting small. Just place down an item or two and add to the list each day. Keep thinking and watch your own list grow.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

ResizeImageHandler.ashx

Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Overcomer

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What does it mean to be an overcomer? The definition given by Merriam-Webster is “to defeat something or someone; to successfully deal with or gain control of something difficult.” I always feel inspired when I hear the song Overcomer by Mandisa. Some of the lyrics say, “Whatever it is you may be going through I know He’s not gonna let it get the best of you… You might be down for a moment feeling like it’s hopeless. That’s when he reminds you that you’re an overcomer.”

As you journey through grief, there will be times when you feel you simply cannot go on. The emotional toll and physical pain of loss can feel unbearable. Confusion and doubt persistently fill your mind. Everywhere you turn, you see reminders of your current situation. At those times it is important that you not give in to defeat. It is exactly when you feel weakest that you can find a way to survive and even learn to thrive again.

Develop into an overcomer! Realize that your weakness only accentuates the strength of God that is available to you. As you call out to Him for help, cling to what you do have. Remember this acronym and be encouraged –

Open up to others so they can help you.

Visualize the sun coming out the next day and life looking better.

Effort is necessary on your part to work through the process of grief.

Reality can be cruel. However,

Commit to living each day the best you know how.

Offer yourself grace in the days ahead.

Make everyday count.

Even if you only manage to get out of bed on a difficult day, you are victorious.

Remember that you are an overcomer!

“The LORD is my strength and my shield; my heart trusts in him, and I am helped. My heart leaps for joy and I will give thanks to him in song.” Psalm 28:7 (NIV)

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

ResizeImageHandler.ashx

Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Life Happens

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As life happens you may find yourself overwhelmed with the details of grief. The first few days after a significant loss can be especially traumatic. I actually have very few clear memories of the first days following my husband’s death. Short recollections play in my mind like small video pieces, convincing me that death did occur and I really did live through it. Here are a few of the memories that still play back from time to time:

Sitting at the table choosing a casket; rifling through papers finding necessary policy numbers and contact information for various companies; having a plate of toast placed in front of me as someone begged me to eat; shopping for a black skirt and breaking down crying as I was paying the cashier; lying in bed for hours unable to sleep; sitting in my living room as good friends and family members visited but not really remembering conversations.

What allows a person to go on autopilot and survive the difficulties of grief and loss? I believe it is grace and mercy that allows the body to be numbed by shock and enables you to carry on without thinking. Some people make the comments, “You are so strong.” “I would never be able to handle what you are going through.” Yet, it is not like you have a choice. Life does not stop for you to get off the rollercoaster of grief. Dealing with those first days after your loved one has died can easily be the hardest thing you will do. There is little to be done in preparing yourself for when life happens. Even if you and your loved one have walked through the difficulty of illness instead of facing a sudden loss, the journey is hard. While you may have had a chance to plan and think about a future without them, when the moment arrives for their departure from this world, you still face the overwhelming loss and demands of many decisions while juggling your feelings and emotions.

I like to think of it as “life happens” instead of “death happens.” Doing this allows a more positive slant on something all of us will experience from time to time. Some losses will be harder than others. Even so, losing loved ones and beginning a journey of grief is part of living. Life continues for you. There is something more to be experienced and enjoyed. Even though it may not feel like it at the moment, you have a purpose and God has a plan. If we focus on the fact that death will transpire at some point, it puts a pessimistic spin on life and you tend to dread the coming days, distracted from what you have right now. Instead of hope and a future, you see an end and possible despair. Therefore, I choose the fact that life happens and I find a way to move forward in the journey of grief.

You can do this too. Treasure the memories of the life you had with your loved one. Work through the heartache that is sure to accompany your loss. Realize that even though your path is filled with ups and downs, you can survive the ride ahead. Face what is before you so that you can eventually see those days in your past as you move forward toward brighter and easier days.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

ResizeImageHandler.ashx

Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Calming Yourself

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Have you ever seen an upset child settle down as a parent speaks in hushed whispers and lightly strokes their back? What about watching a startled adult place a hand to their chest as they gasp and struggle to catch their breath, working to recover from whatever had frightened them? Calming yourself is a technique that you share with young children and learn to do yourself as you age. Do you recall how nice it was as a child to have someone embrace you and tell you that everything would be all right? I know that I have occasionally longed for that experience of comfort even as an adult since I have been journeying through grief. Trying to handle everything on your own can be taxing and exhausting. Calming yourself in the midst of loss and pain is a valuable skill.

I recall the first night of Alan’s death, just hours after leaving the hospital a final time. I lay in bed trying to sleep. Apparently I dozed off because suddenly I was in the midst of a nightmare as I sat straight up in bed and found myself crying aloud, tears flowing down my cheeks, rocking back and forth in an effort to calm down. A friend who was spending that first night with me heard my cries and immediately came in to rub my back, hug me, and allow me to rest my head on her shoulder. Calming yourself sometimes takes the aid of another.

When you find yourself in the midst of great stress and anxiety, what do you do? Sitting and crying for a while can be therapeutic. Perhaps reading a book pulls you to another world and relieves your pain for a while. Running a hot bath after a long, tiring day can bring relaxation to tight muscles and aching limbs. Calming yourself with Epsom salts and bubbles can work wonders in improving the view of your next few hours. And when you are aching, scared, and feeling alone, that may be all the further ahead you can look. Venturing forward into tomorrow’s plans can seem too harsh and too much of a herculean effort. If you find yourself in this situation, know that you need look no further than what you are able. The future – at least tomorrow – will take care of itself, so concentrate on making it through just today.

Calming yourself with bright hope and promises of better days can truly be a gift. Realize that you will not always feel lost and alone. Encourage yourself by singing that famous song from Annie, “The sun will come out tomorrow…..” Even though tomorrow may seem daunting, it can give you the incentive you need to make it through your present day.

Allow the tears to flow, the rocking to proceed, and the healing to resume as you find ways of calming yourself along your grief journey. Embracing your fears and hurts will actually help propel you forward along your grief journey.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

ResizeImageHandler.ashx

Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

The Empty Room

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I recently attended a funeral. While I didn’t personally know the deceased, I am very close to several of his family members. We arrived early to make sure all the details were being handled for the music and media that would be used during the service. At one point, everyone left that family holding room leaving me to myself. I stood and looked around realizing the significance of the moment in that empty room. Having experienced an incredibly difficult loss myself five years ago, I took a few minutes to think back over time to see the empty room for what it stood for in my own life.

When all the friends and family go home after the service and the obligatory condolences are said, you are left with the empty room. There comes a time all too soon after your loss when you find yourself alone and trying to figure out what is next. One moment you have more than enough people around you and then the next you would give almost anything for the diversion and company of someone sitting with you again.

The empty room conveys a closure to your loss that you may not be prepared for. Seeing the vacancy that loss brings is stark and painful. No longer can you hide behind the need to play host or hostess to a room full of people. Keeping busy meeting others’ needs and concentrating on anything but your own hurt and loss is no longer an option. Now the empty room looms over your days and nights.

Now that you see the barrenness that grief can bring, how do you handle it? What can you do to move forward on your journey and not feel locked away and trapped by the empty room? Recognizing the posture of being alone is the first step. When you find yourself dreading to return to your own empty room, be intentional to change your position. Make plans to go out with friends. Invite someone over, asking them to pick up dinner on the way. It is within your power to alter the emptiness.

For those times when the empty room persists, embrace the quiet. Set aside time to mourn, remember, cry, and be thankful for what you once had. Realize that your daily schedule may not give you the time you need to heal. So take advantage of the empty room to do just that – begin to heal and face the reality of your loss. This will be the beginning of learning how to live again with the great change that has been brought into your life.

Be encouraged when you see the empty room. Don’t feel that you need to run from it, but also don’t feel trapped by its existence. It’s just a room. What you do with it will make the difference in your own grief journey.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

ResizeImageHandler.ashx

Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Being Yourself

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I remember when I was a kid someone asked me who I wanted to be when I grew up. Not “what” but “who.” At that time, I named a person that I admired saying I wanted to be like them. While we all may feel like taking on someone else’s identity at times, as an adult you need to realize that is not best for you. It is important to embrace the fact that you are special and unique and you should be yourself.

While walking through grief, it is understandable to wish to be someone else, thinking anyone else’s journey is easier and better than the one you are traveling right now. There are several problems with this way of thinking though.

The first and most obvious one is that you can’t do it. You cannot be someone else. No matter how hard you wish for it, you are who you are. Your dreams of someone else’s life will not change your day-to-day walk that is currently filled with loss and hardship. Wishing to be anyone but who you are will not get you where you need to go.

Another challenge to wishing to be someone else is that doing so will not help to move you forward in your grief journey. Progress and healing will only begin when you accept what has come into your life. Only then will you be in the position to receive help. You don’t have to like what is happening in your life, but you do need to be realistic and admit that your life has changed. That is the first step to learning to being yourself again.

Even though your life has changed, you are the same person. Yes, you are shaped by the circumstances you face. But you do not have to be defeated by those conditions. Proudly be yourself – for no one else can be. You have something to offer. You complete a space in this world that nobody else can fill. As you convince yourself of this truth, you can find joy again. Have the confidence that life will settle down, even out, and you have many things to look forward to as you concentrate on being yourself.

That is how Grief Letters came to be. Through my own journey in facing the pain of loss, I decided to take the things I had learned and share them. In doing so, I found healing and hope that I could pass on to others through my writing. If I had denied who I was and what was happening to me, I would never have had the opportunity to write, publish, and help others.

Being yourself is the best decision you can make as you learn to live life well and move forward in your grief.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Having hope and purpose is not impossible when facing loss and pain. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

ResizeImageHandler.ashx

Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Stand in line

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The other day I stopped by my local county building to get my car tags. Even though I arrived fifteen minutes before the office opened, a good-sized line had already formed. I stood patiently watching the people near me. One young lady was panicking and calling her mother saying she didn’t have her insurance card. They seemed to be trying to scan a picture in to her email to remedy the problem.

Other people behind me were impatiently debating as to whether they wanted to stand in line and wait for their turn. They seemed defeated with the need to stand in line behind so many people. Was the wait really going to be worthwhile? While standing in line is not always pleasant, it is necessary at times.

As small children you learn to stand in line. Make it straight, hands to yourself, be still and quiet, and follow the person in front of you. While this skill is one that you probably perfected in your school years, somehow, walking through grief and being expected to stand in line waiting to feel better seems overwhelming and unrealistic.

The thing that many people fail to understand is that the grief journey is anything but straight. The path is not one that allows you to walk and follow the person in front of you. One person’s grief is never exactly like another person’s grief. You are not afforded the ease of just seeing someone else’s path and following their exact footsteps. Loss just does not work that way. There are no clear lines and no sure map to follow.

However, you can find some direction as you journey through grief. Because your loss is unique to you, there is no need to feel that you must stand in line and wait for others to determine your path. Sure, you can gain great insight by watching others. Some people will inspire you, giving you hope and the courage to face what life has handed you as you move forward one step at a time. By watching others though, you may learn things you do not want to do as you live each day missing your loved one. Perhaps their missteps will save you some pain down the road.

As you move forward, remember that you get to choose how you grieve. You get to say when you need to stop and cry, and when you want to embrace victory and laugh out loud. Do not let the world demand that you stand in line and hold yourself back from the healing that is just ahead of you. Put one foot in front of the other and begin your walk. Your time to stand in line is finished. Now you get to move forward and be restored.

Until next time –

Karen

Grief Letters is available for you to purchase. Begin the year with hope and purpose. This devotion book is filled with lessons learned from my own journey as well as suggested activities written to help achieve forward progress through grief. Place your order today!

ResizeImageHandler.ashx

Grief Letters By Karen Bransgrove, Published by WestBow Press. You can order here.

Hardcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869674

Softcover | 6 x 9 in | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869667

E-Book | 114 pages | ISBN 9781490869650

Also available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.